Feb 01 2018
Priya Krishna
2 Minutes to read

Who doesn’t love a juicy burger encased in a squishy bun? But more and more people adopting vegetarian and vegan diets, the popularity and breadth of meatless burgers has grown significantly. Grub Street, proclaimed that “veggie burgers are poised to be the country’s most exciting new burgers.” And chief among these popular new meatless burger options: the Impossible Burger.

What is the Impossible Burger?

From the innovative, science-driven company Impossible Foods, the Impossible Burger is a meatless patty made entirely of plant products, including wheat, coconut oil, and potatoes. Its secret ingredient is heme, the molecule that allows meat to bleed and become juicy when cooked. Heme is what gives the Impossible Burger its exceptionally meaty, craveable taste and texture, making it equally appealing to carnivores and veg-heads alike.

Aside from the appeal of the burger itself, the Impossible Burger is incredibly resource-efficient, using 95 percent land, 87 percent greenhouse gas emissions, and 74 percent less water than a traditional, beef-based burger. So it’s healthier and better for the environment.

How to Eat an Impossible Burger

Top chefs from all across the country are now advocating for and serving the Impossible Burger as a standalone menu item, not just a beef burger substitute. At Momofuku Nishi in New York, chef David Chang offers the Impossible Burger three different ways. The Crowdpleaser comes with the classic lettuce, tomato, and pickle combo. The Stack House is piled high with onion rings, avocado, and BBQ ranch. And the newest addition, the West Side comes with a squiggle of truffle mayo, smoked gouda, and pickles. Meanwhile, at Jardinière in San Francisco, chef Traci des Jardins serves it in true California style, topped generously with avocado, little gem lettuce, and caramelized onions, plus a house-made dijonnaise.

At Saxon + Parole in New York the burger comes topped with mushrooms three ways: mushroom puree, roasted oyster mushrooms, and truffle cream — plus sherry-soaked onions. It’s certainly as rich as a cheeseburger, but without any of the meat. And at Little Donkey in Boston, their take on the Impossible Burger (which is served at lunch), comes topped with a Sambal-infused mustard, tomato jam, smoked tofu aioli, and, for a classic flair, a slice of American cheese. Each of these is a great showcase of the wide range of creative, gourmet ways that the Impossible Burger can be prepared on a menu.

But at M Burger in Chicago, the star offering is the Impossible Burger. The classic midwestern burger joint has long been serving diner-style burgers and shakes. The Impossible Burger is prepared just like its beef burgers, with a melting slice of American cheese, special sauce, shredded lettuce, pickles, and tomatoes. Order one alongside an old-fashioned cheeseburger, and it’s likely you won’t even be able to tell the difference.

M Burger Impossible Burger Recipe

If you want to get the delicious taste of the M Burger Impossible Burger, try this quick and easy recipe.

  1. Season Impossible meat patty with kosher salt and black pepper.
  2. Sear on the grill under edges become crispy, and meat is cooked through. It should take about 2 minutes.
  3. Butter and toast bun.
  4. Place patty on bun, along with vine ripe tomatoes, crispy iceberg lettuce, pickles, and M sauce (an even mixture of mayonnaise, ketchup, and relish)
  5. Take a big bite, and savor the juicy deliciousness.
Key Takeaways
  • Veggie burgers are one of the most popular and growing categories in the burger industry. So if you have a burger on your menu, having a veggie burger option is a must.
  • Veggie burgers don’t have to be bland and tasteless. The Impossible Burger demonstrate how there are great options for juicy, craveable burgers that don’t have any meat in them.
  • Don’t be afraid to be just as creative with toppings for a veggie burger as you would for a beef burger.

Do you want to learn more about how the burger industry is being shaken up? Read our Q&A with Beta Burger founder Adrian Wong.

Check it out

Want more? Subscribe to the ezCater blog

Written by:

Priya Krishna

Priya Krishna is a food writer, and the author of the college-centric cookbook, Ultimate Dining Hall Hacks. Follow her on Twitter and Instagram @PKgourmet

Posted in: Trends in FoodNeed to Know

Tagged with: Burgers, Dietary Restrictions, Food Ordering, Food Trends, Vegetarian